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20121224
20130101
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
prices. we'll go in focus with steve bor bes and bill and morgan. is it paying off? >> no, it is 18 times that of nuclear energy. ronald reagan was right. thest thing to immortality is a government program. politicians are labeled with hot wind and we label the section gone with the wind. >> we have sending sib sidies in '92, has it been worth it. >> we are early inlet process. we have subsidized oil and coal and gas. we have done them from darn near a century. these don't look so bad. like it or not, the majority of americans believe that global warming is an issue. we need to develop clear energy sources. fossil fuels may be a difficult problem. we are subsidizing thingings. it is cheaper to produce energy from natural gas. it is a subsidies. other than it is natural gas there. it is 63 cents compared to $53. that is not a pay off to me. >> i will have to disagree with rick. last time wind energy had any impact was in the century. we have moved in oil and natural gas. but let's get rid of subsidies and let them sink or swim. wind energy will sink and we'll be better off. it is behathe s
writer steve moore also joins the panel. so, steve, this is really an interesting story that i don't think gets enough attention. >> i agree. >> paul: the reforms taking place across the country in a lot of states. who are the stars you're looking at? >> i entirely agreement with your premise, paul. if you look at, talk about the demise of the republicans on the national levels we're not seeing that on the state level. there are 30 republican governors today in america, the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina so that south now is almost entirely republican, whereas just 25 years ago, it was pretty entirely democratic. and it's not just the south. states like-- >> what are they doing with that power, that's the interesting thing. >> so, they have the power and they are actually using it, af got states like kansas, and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you've got a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican, where they're aggressively promoting pro energy drilling policies to get at the national resources
moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critics have accused him of playing politics with russian children. >> criticized it on humanitarian grounds. >> yes, absolutely. it's interesting to note that the bill we're talking about, the law we're talking about is wider than simply banning adoptions. it's russia's retaliation for the act that bans russians officials suspected of human rights violations from getting u.s. visa's and freezes their assets. so this bans u.s. officials from coming to russia, u.s. officials who have committed abuses and crimes against russian ci
agrees that that action is necessary. gregg: steve hayes, is the senior writer for "the weekly standard" and a fox news contributor. steve, great to see you. the deal being bandied about right now to raise taxes on higher earners actually doesn't appear to do anything to fix the problem, that is, all the new revenue from higher taxes would be used for more spending. as we understand about 850 billion in new revenue would be spent on eliminating the fiscal cliff automatic spending cuts and extending unemployment checks. is it true not a dial would go to cutting the real problem, the debt and deficit? >> yeah. in one scenario that is absolutely the case. we shouldn't actually be surprised. it has been clear at least for a short amount of time that this hasn't been the goal of these discussions. i mean for all the talk about deficit reduction and despite the fact that this began as an effort to rein in spending after the 2010 elections, it is clear democrats in the house and senate, i would argue the president, haven't been serious about long-term spending cuts. gregg: maybe they're not se
: let's bring in the author of how rich people think. steve, the rich voted not in overwhelming numbers but they certainly gave many of their votes to president obama in the last election. now, the rich people in america are going to have to pay higher tax rates. you know the rich. you know all about them. you're with them all the time. you write about them. how do they feel about this? >> well, i think the bottom line is, stuart, that the rich that voted for obama voted for obama based on his social policies not his fiscal policies. i don't think they are any happen per about the fiscal policies than anyone else, except maybe the very very wealthy, you know, maybe the michael bloombergs and the warren buffetts. stuart: i think there's a distinction here between wealth, accumulated money which you sit on and which is not taxed, and income, tax flow, which is taxed. i think there's a distinction between the two. when i say the rich, i guess i'm primarily referring to wealthy people who have accumulated wealth and they are sitting on it. they don't care if other people pay higher tax rate
iron oar a lot. >> let's get more insight from steve from web bush securities. how much of a nail biter is this for you in terms of fiscal cliff and the markets? >> i think pretty clear at this point that if there's a deal coming, it's gonna be coming very, very soon. i think the markets discounted the fact we are going to get some sort of deal t has held up fairly well here and i think if we don't get a deal, we will see a selloff. i don't know how considerable, but certainly see the 2, 3% decline in the market. >> does it amaze you, steve, that the markets, in your view, still consider a given that we are going to reach a deal? here we are thursday, december 27th. they still haven't issued a 48-hur notice for congress to return to capitol hill and yet you're saying the markets have baked in some sort of deal? >> yeah, i think so. i don't in he isly think the deal happened december 31st. if we pass waite without a deal earthquake the market will think something is going to happen in early january this is the way washington works, they walk right up to the edge of the deal, maybe even p
faced over past three decades politically. gregg: what of john boehner though? steve latourette, who said, the same 50 or 60 chuckle heads who always screw things up, speaking of the tea party group. >> yeah. gregg: he said it is not really the speaker's fault. is it the speaker's fault? >> well, look, i think boehner was, he is in a bad spot. there are no good outcomes here for republicans. there have been no good policy outcomes for republicans. i watched the steven latourette comment, one of the things that struck me, these are the guys, 50 or 60 chuckle heads came here and screwed things up. the presumption congress was working just fine before they arrived. i would argue that it is nice we have people in congress who are actually serious about looking at the long term consequences of our overspending over these past couple of decades. that is where the real problem is. he can say they're stubborn and not willing to compromise and all things he said repeatedly as he made those criticisms but the reality is they're actually trying to solve the long-term problem. he may not like th
it to a neighbor of obama's. he didn't know whether to say whether that note was ever delivered. >> who is steve rogers, who you also interviewed? >> he is a professor at the kellogg school of management. at northwestern university. >> what was his connection with president obama? >> like many african-american businessmen and leaders, whom i interviewed, he was an early backer and supporter. he was primary to bobby rush in 2000. the former black panther corpsmen. he went around looking for people who donate money to his cause. steve rogers is a very successful businessman before he became a professor. he had $6000, i believe, to pay off some of his personal debt. in return, obama promised that he would visit steve rogers students. and if he won the u.s. senate seat, he did win the u.s. senate seat. rogers never heard from him, so he called him up and asked obama witty comment, and he said, i am too busy. i am getting phone calls from warren buffett and from steve jobs and bill gates in all of these important people. and he said, but you, it's. and obama said, well, you know, promises made by pol
. >> julie seger watches c-span on verizon. >> on the subject of the fiscal cliff, we spoke to steve forbes this morning and got his take on the subject. host: joining us now is the chairman and editor in chief of forbes media, steve forbes. he will be with us for the next 45 minutes to take your calls. let's start with where we started this morning on "washington journal." have you looked at the fiscal cliff and have you made plans or altered your 2013 spending as a business owner on this issue? guest: the answer is not yet. the big factor will be what happens in health care, which kicks in it in 2013 and 2014. you're kind of immobilize until we get a fix. we are moving ahead on the projects we are doing. people are being cautious. we hope this thing will be successfully resolved and that we do not go into a recession next year. host: how would you like to see this issue played out in washington? what is the best economic solution? guest: the best economic solution is to avoid raising taxes. the best we can hope for is that they kick the can down the road for a couple of months. you are no
of bankruptcy? you can't go more than bankrupt. and extreme leader steve jobs, for example, might be the one person. if you're the voter and you think the united is in a crisis, and the system has failed and the people who choosing normally cannot get us out clearly had. you want to gamble. the system isn't working anymore. it's time break. and you can't get a worse outcome than total failure than bankruptcy and civil war. so that's one thing. the second i think there are anythings you do if you choose to take an extreme. you should reshape the job. you should never have an outside ceo the chairman and board of directors. there's no circumstances there's a good idea. .. and change course when they're wrong, but were everyone else always been the fair rate. so i think the key if you look at lincoln and judith folkman, an extraordinary scientt
will be joined by steve forbes. later, discussion on background checks, how they work, who gets them, and when they are required. our guest is matt bennett. "washington journal," live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. a cornell university law professor has written books on increasing stock prices. she spoke about what she described as the corporate world in the effort to maximize profits in the short term, but but greater the long-term value of any company. [applause] >> good evening, everyone, and welcome. professor lynn stout is a distinguished professor at the cornell university law school. our work focuses on the intersection of law, business, and morality -- her work focuses on the intersection of law, business, and morality. she has worked with many organizations around the world, including the clinton global initiative. in 2012, she was named tom on the economy -- top on the economy. her new book is the shareholder yth.es met please welcome professor lynn stout. [applause] >> thank you, charles, for that kind introduction. i want to start by saying what an honor it is for me to speak in f
, apple. the first year without steve jobs and a company that's trying to prove under a new ceo that it can still invent things that we didn't even know we needed that we would buy, faster than anything's ever been sold in personal technology before. number nine, the u.s. stock market. despite all those worries about the fiscal cliff and maybe slower growth in the u.s. economy, the stock market has had a great year. too bad you missed out. the smart money's been in the market. the rest of us have been worried about the fiscal cliff. >> number eight, facebook's ipo. hundreds of millions of people like facebook, but investors did not on its first day as a public company. trading glitches at the nasdaq and questions about the company's ability to make money on mobile users pummeled the stock, which has yet to climb its way back to its ipo price. >> number seven, mother meyer. the new ceo of yahoo! who announced that she was just going to take a two-week maternity leave, as she was going to try to turn this company around. 37 years old, it looks like a mother's touch is exactly what
. steve jobs had been cast out, he comes back in, reinvents the company. it's one of the greatest business success stories in the history of modern society if not longer. >> at one point, apple stock approached $700, right? now the stock is, what, near $600? >> yeah, likely because of capital gains. >> who can afford to buy the stock? >> studies have shown, mike, if you buy one share -- you have $500 to invest, you buy one share of a $500 company, you might not think you can make as much as buying ten shares of a $50 company, many studies show you can make just as much because it's $50 for a reason. >> buy one share. i'm not advising. >> where is the libor scandal story? a dozen banks. >> thanks a lot, by the way. >> apparently, my hatred of the uk helped. i didn't want to say libor. >> i know it's boring. >> because the antinm, bore. and i promised barnicle that i wasn't going to say fiscal cliff. i promised not to say it. i found other stories. and libor, i hear you. >> i love that story. terrible word. >> that's what we talk about, libor. in the real world, no. >> big deal. banks are do
negotiations as congress returns to washington. we are joined by steve forbes. later, a discussion on background checks, how they work, who gets them, and when they are required. our guest is matt denn it. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> i just enjoy that it is straight forward, comprehensive, and you can really sense what is happening without a pundit interjecting, and that is what i really appreciate about c-span. it is definitely a great resource for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now, state and defense department officials testified at a hearing on violence in the eastern congo. a rebel group of congolese army defectors has been terrorizing people. the congolese army, with the aid of u.n. peacekeepers, has been battling the defectors for the past eight months. this is an hour and 40 minutes. >> the situation in the democratic republic of congo continues to ev
. as the deadline for the fiscal cliff does loom, what does it peen if your money if we do not get a deal? steve liesman has more on that. >> we talk about a lot of these big numbers that are out there and we don't talk about what it means to individuals. so let me see if i can break down the big numbers into something that might mean something to individual people here. $620 billion, that's the number that's the total revenue increases and spending cuts. about $130 billion of the automatic cuts that john harwood was just talking about, talking about trying to ally for a little while. 1920. that's if you break it down by every man, woman and child in america. that's the per capita fiscal cliff effect. but that effects a lot of people differently here. $26.2 million. that's the number of americans that will be caught by the amt, the alter naf tax system, unless congress comes up with a patch and that's part of the whole fiscal cliff effect. come on over here, we'll show you more. 2.1 million, that's the number of long term unemployed americans who will lose the extended benefits again if there's
, however, he was inducted into the academy of television arts hall of fame in 1992 and in 2005 he steve the presidential medal of freedom and won a grammy in 1997 for his album of gospel music but his legacy for many will be the andy griffith theme song. >> of course. >> i didn't realize it went out at the top of the ratings like i love lucy and seinfedl. >> and henry hill. >> a a know torous new york city mob teresa payton and fbi informant jess died from heart failure and lived a complicated life from drug cartels to the air france robbery which then formed the base for the martin score saycy film. popular characteristic. >>> and robin giv gibb of the bee gees. stayin' alive and how deep it your love. >> best known for being one of the members of the bee gees with a career spanning six decades. they he sold more than 220 million records worldwide. divide as one of the major figures in the history of british music. he will be remembered for putting the disco on the map in the late '70s and creating the saturday night fever soundtrack starring john travolta can. and he received multiple
is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bil
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)